imagemap
Jean SIBELIUS (1865-1957)
Cover Illustration by Matthew Harvey, 1997 Symphony No.6 in D minor, op.104
Symphony No.7 in C
, op.105
Tapiola
, op.112

Lahti Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Osmo Vänskä

BIS Records BIS-CD-864
[68:16] full-price

Symphony No.7 in one track.

by the Inkpot Sibelius Nutcase

At last, the final instalment of the Lahti SO and Osmo Vänskä’s BIS Sibelius Symphonies cycle. Appropriately, it ends with the Sixth and Seventh Symphonies and the Symphonic Poem Tapiola - in many ways Sibelius' "last symphony".

Here we have a bright and winsomely beautiful performance of the Sixth Symphony (1923), as in the first movement, full of fairy lightness and glittering sunlight. Indeed, the Lahti players bring much light to a D minor symphony, something which I found very heartwarming. The second movement opens nostalgically, with distinctively flavoured orchestral colours despite the economy of the score. As usual, the Lahti/BIS team is wondrous at revealing every intricate detail in the score, especially with the shimmering strings and fluttering birdsong - like some magical trip into a half-lit forest. (There is a story of Sibelius and his habit of turning on the radio to full volume when his music was being played, so that he could hear every single note.)

The third movement poco vivace includes a quaint passage which I call a "march of the fairies" which is joyfully yet nobly delivered here. Throughout this performance there is beautifully luminous stringwork, including the harp. This is one of very few recordings I know of where the harp sits comfortably in the orchestra, playing as an orchestral harp sprinkling a field of sparkling stars over all, without screaming out for attention.

Sibelius in 1920 The Allegro molto finale is satisfyingly unified - all the different threads and moods are beautifully weaved together. The final moments are both heartwarming and heartbreaking to the core, with its gentle, serene yet infinitely sad ending, half yearning, half hymning. It is ephemerally fleeting and all the more sad, full of some fading distant sorrow, and yet smiling with contented resignation.

This performance broke and healed my soul - it is the most endearing Sixth I have ever heard. The CD is worth its price for this alone.


As for the Seventh Symphony (1924), I found the reading here rather cool, similar to the straight-faced account by Blomstedt on Decca. With the Lahti strings singing in a soft, glowing tone, there is a slow and noble buildup to the first appearance of the great trombone theme. The orchestral soundscape is deep and sweeping, like a great field of clouds surrounding the Alpine trombone peak. Like the harp in the Sixth, the trombone soloist stays within the orchestral picture without sticking out.

The central sections of the Symphony are performed relaxed - it is almost graceful. The second climax in C minor is similarly expansive and dark, but not really intense in the manner of Karajan. The buildup to the last appearance is the most magnificent, with a long drawn-out prelude. The 2nd and 3rd trombones weave into the principal's solo with a powerful and grand choral effect. The ensuing section of bass rumblings is surprising quiet. The high strings soar impressively into the heights before introducing the horns; then a natural link to the quiescent flute solo that preceeds the final Largamente. And here, the Lahti’ans bring the Symphony to its grand conclusion with all due grandeur. The final bars are concisely uttered, neither drawn out nor clipped. Generally, I prefer it drawn out, but I guess this one makes its point.

The Lahti Symphony Orchestra at the Church of the Cross A noble performance - not an emotional one, but certainly musically moulded, with the score cleanly held together with intelligent - not sterile - hands. Above all, the Lahti orchestra's colours are breathtaking. To be honest, I found this performance very difficult to describe. As you all know, I'm totally biased towards the Lahti "Dream" Team and the Seventh is my favourite symphony - yet, I found this rendition hard to praise and also hard to fault. It is not a reading that really moves me, but neither can I seriously call it inadequate - the decision depends on your needs then.


Wide-spread they stand, the Northland's dusky forests,
Ancient, mysterious, brooding savage dreams;
Within them dwells the Forest's mighty God,
And wood-sprites in the gloom weave magic secrets.
*

*to be read with a foreboding James Earl Jones voice.

Illustration by Matthew Harvey, 1997 The great tone poem Tapiola (1925-6) is Sibelius' last major symphonic work, depicting the forest essence of the Finnish God of the Forests, Tapio. Within five years of its premiere, it was already being called "the culminating point of [Sibelius'] entire creative activity, and a consummate masterpiece... Even if Sibelius had written nothing else this one work would be sufficient to entitle him to a place among the greatest masters of all time" (Cecil Gray).

There is an understatedly terrifying quality to the music - not in the stereotypical relentless, noisy, "avant garde" style, but in a deliberately quiet, brooding way, as of the Forest's eyes watching your every move as you tread between the trunks, the winding roots of his children. Vänskä has a way with the quick phrases - very sudden and frightening flashes of terror. Yet he never dwells on these excessively, rearing the vision of Tapio only long enough for you to catch a good look - and shiver. His masterly moulding of tempi is very effective, every shift like the undulating breaths and unseen movements of the Forest God. In contrast to the (very sudden!) loud utterances of terror is the gloomy chill of the slowly breathing, mist-enshrouded sections.

Scandinavian orchestras are experts at creating the chilly, glowing, steely tone that fits the stark yet varied textures of this tone poem. (A notable exception is the Berlin Philharmonic in Karajan's legendary and spine-tingling 1984 recording on DG 413-755 or 445-518.) It is like looking at the simple silhouette of a tree (canopy and trunk) - as shafts of light stream through the canopy, you realize the immense intricacy of the branches, the leaves, the grooves and cracks of the bark or even the invisible root system embedded in the ground.

At 14'16", the orchestra suddenly disappears - the CD goes silent. I know many listeners will think either the disc has ended or "There goes BIS again, with their ridiculously extreme volume range." This part of the score (between letters P and Q) is marked "dim(inuendo) possibile" and pp. I am now convinced that the inclusion of silence is deliberate. As in the conclusion of the Fifth Symphony, there is meaning in silence (but I'm not refering to any postmodernist idiocy regarding 4'33"). Those of you who might have walked into the middle of a forest alone will understand.

Illustration by Matthew Harvey, 1997 You suddenly stop and stand among all these ancient trees. Listen. Don't make a single sound, just listen. The silence is at first deafening, but then you realize it isn't that quiet. Listen carefully, and you may hear a distant bird calling out, or a rustle of leaves.

Listen on and you will hear the trickle of water somewhere, or the sound of a leaf falling, forest sprites weaving their magic secrets. Listen, and you will hear the sap of tree-blood coursing through the ancient wood. Now you can even hear the orchestra. You can hear the wooden limbs of trees moving ever so slowly, stretching with primeval strength toward the light.

Finally, you will hear Tapio himself breathe, his heart pulsating in the Earth beneath your feet. The living wood of the string instruments begin to sing of their true homeland, as they hymn the misty final chords in the serene glow of B major... Then you know... for you are in... Tapiola.

S I B E L I U S
Nature is coming
to life: that life
which I so love,
now and always,
whose essence
shall pervade
everything which
I compose.

Dedicated to the lost forests of the Earth.

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19.4.98. up.15.5.1998. up.27.11.2000 ©Inkpot Sibelius Nutcase

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INKTRODUCTIONS:

  • Symphony No.1 With Recordings Survey

  • Symphony No.5 With Recordings Survey

  • Symphony No.7 With Recordings Survey

  • Kullervo Symphony With Recordings Survey

  • Tapiola


    CD REVIEWS:
    The Lahti Symphony/Vänskä Cycle (BIS, 1996-99):
    Nos. 1 & 4
    Nos.2 & 3
    No.5 (original and final versions)
    Nos. 6 & 7, and Tapiola

    The Bournemouth Symphony/Berglund Cycle (1970s)
    Click here

    The Iceland Symphony/Sakari Cycle (Naxos, 1996-2000)
    Nos. 1 & 3
    No. 2 & Tempest Suite #1
    Nos. 4 & 5
    Nos. 6 & 7. Tempest Suite No.2
    Finlandia. Karelia Suite. Lemminkäinen Suite

  • [an error occurred while processing this directive] Readers' Comments
    From: n Ravi (niveditahr@rediffmail.com / Tuesday, December 31, 2002 at 14:51:18)

    Wonderful review.The visuals are a treat and add colour to the words.Very insightful and creative.When i listened to the 6th symphony by The Halle Orchestra conducted by Sir John Barbirolli,i felt just like what is described here-The Fairy like lightness blended with a certain poignancy(the opening Oboe Theme).